Sunday, October 21, 2018

Another Attempt At Erasing The Transgendered



First, it was the states’ trying to ban the federal protections that Obama put in place under Title IX barring discrimination and sexual orientation.  In 2016, the Department of Education required schools to allow transgender students to use the restroom or locker room of their choice.  If a school didn’t comply, it could risk losing federal funds.

Then, the present Administration wanted to bar transgender individuals from the military, but the military knew better.

Now, the Trump Administration wants to limit the meaning of gender to male or female on birth certificates. Passports would change language from gender as well to sex.  The New York Times memo from the Department of Health and Human Services plans by the end of the year to create a legal definition of gender that will be sent to the Department of Justice.  It would be defined as a fixed status, “on a biological basis that’s clear, grounded in science, objective, and administrable, unless rebutted by reliable genetic evidence.” Genetic testing would be used to determine a person’s gender.

The Dept. of Health and Human Services plans to create this edict under Title IX law that bans discrimination based on sex in federally funded education programs.  In 2017, Trump’s administration thought that Obama’s directive was a “federal outreach.” The HHS department has argued that the term “sex” was never legally meant to include homosexuality and gender identity.

The effects of Limiting Federal Protections for The Transgendered Community:

According to the Williams Institute, a think tank for LGBT research in California, a 2016 study revealed that 1.4 million American adults identify as transgender. Yet, with society’s non-inclusion, their stigmatized existence has resulted in:

64% of trans pupils are bullied for their sexual identity.
82% of transgender youth feel unsafe at school.
2018 is the worse year for deadly assaults against transgender Americans.
Most of the violent deaths are against transgender people of color.
More than ½ of transgender male adolescents attempt suicide.
Suicide rate is higher for transgendered than for LGB community.

This new directive is undermining the welfare and rights of the LGBT people by eliminating federal protections.  It could also be defining transgender out of existence.







   


Monday, October 8, 2018

Not Coming Out on LGBTQ Awareness Day



October 11 is the 30th annual LGBTQ Awareness Day. The purpose of the day is to make LGBTQ orientation more familiar to the public, reduce bullying, and help foster allies in the fight for equality.

Although it would be ideal if everyone felt he could come out, the LGBT child has his own timeline.  Tempting as it may be, it’s not a good idea for a parent to push a child into coming out.  The child should come out when he is ready and when he does, parents should ask for permission to tell others.  Your child may only be out to a few people he trusts and does not want everyone to know.  It’s his story. 

If a child does come out to you on October 11 or any other date, make it his experience, recommends Dr. Logan Stohle, PsyD. Of Yellowbrick, a psychiatric center for young adults in Evanston, Illinois.  Don’t bring up your concerns at that time. Even if you don’t agree or understand your child’s sexual orientation, now is not the time to question.  Just listen. 

Says Jonathan L. Tobkes, M.D., author of When Your Child Is Gay: What You Need To Know (2016, Sterling), you might employ these subtle ways to make your LBTQ child feel as supported as his heterosexual brother/sister by:

Asking your child the same questions you ask your other children.  Specifically, don’t avoid the topic of dating and relationships.  Be sure to invite the significant other to family dinners or functions in the same way you would for a partner of a straight child.  From time to time, make a point of asking your child how his significant others are doing, what are new with them, and so forth.

Accept whatever your child tells you about his sexuality as hard fact and do not try and convince him that he must be either straight or gay. 

The most important thing is to make it clear to your child that sexual orientation is only one part of who he is and that it has no bearing on your love for or acceptance of him.